Fantastic review by Tom Nolan in The Wall Street Journal

THE WALL STREET JOURNAL

Mysteries: Surviving a Trifecta of Traumas

A damaged woman takes on a cold case--the abduction and murder of her younger sister.

By Tom Nolan

April 6, 2018

Boston's Kate Wolfe, the 32-year-old child psychiatrist at the center of Alice Blanchard's terrifying thriller "A Breath After Drowning" (Titan, 441 pages, $14.95), endured a grim childhood. Her mother was committed to an asylum when Kate was 10--and later committed suicide. Kate's younger sister was kidnapped and murdered in a horrific way. Her father retreated into solitude soon after.

But Kate survived her "trifecta of traumas" to devote her adult life to a career helping young people negotiate similar crises--in part as a way of assuaging the guilt she still feels for having left her sister alone the night she was abducted. It is all the more distressing, then, when an emotionally vulnerable teenage patient hangs herself as soon as Kate prepares to leave on a long-deferred vacation. "None of this was your fault," her old mentor tells her. "Sometimes the darkness takes over." In this case, the darkness won't let go. At her patient's funeral, Kate encounters Palmer Dyson, a retired police detective from her hometown back in New Hampshire. Palmer shares his doubts that the man convicted of killing Kate's sister--and soon to be executed--is actually guilty. After meeting the condemned man, Kate begins to have doubts of her own. It could be that the real killer is still at large.

With the ex-cop's guidance, Kate is soon acting like a detective in her own right: poring through old police files, considering alternative scenarios and using her psychiatric training to deduce the identity of someone Palmer is convinced is an undetected serial killer.

Bizarre coincidences and shocking revelations concerning former neighbors and Kate's own family members, as well as the murder of the mother of another one of her patients, cause Kate to question her own hard-earned sanity. But she'll need all her wits about her, and then some, to eventually do battle with one of the most memorable genre villains since Hannibal Lecter.